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Jeptha Young

  • Barbara Young
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9 years 7 months ago #354 by Barbara Young
Barbara Young created the topic: Jeptha Young
My husband is the great, great grandfather was Jeptha Young, woolen cloth weaver and poet. We have been researching the family for some time now and wondered if anyone can help at all with any information on the family. Do any copies of his poetry books still exist and are any other descendents living in the area please.

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  • Karianne Fisher
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9 years 5 months ago #370 by Karianne Fisher
Karianne Fisher replied the topic: Re:Jeptha Young
Jeptha Young
Jeptha Young was a self-taught poet who lived in King's Stanley during the mid to latter half of the nineteenth century. Jeptha was a weaver, working at Stanley Mill, who had been born in Bisley around 1812 and had then moved to Middle Yard in 1839 with his wife and nine children. He wrote at least three volumes of poetry. This is an extract from his poem 'Selsley Hill.' which first appeared in 'Rural Poems; or Rhymes from the Loom' published in the 1850s:


For ages Selsley Hill has stood,
Before the fall, before the flood
Its mighty base was laid;
Before the sun his rays possessed
Or drove his chariot to the west,
It reared its lofty head.

Perhaps upon this pleasant spot
Fierce battles have been often fought,
Where thousands bled and died;
The spear, the battle-axe and bow,
Lie buried here, for aught we know,
Close by the warriors side.

It may be here the Briton stood,
And faced the Roman foe, while blood
Dyed nature's carpet red;
Or here the Saxon drove the Dane
Down its steep side, whilst like the rain
The showers of arrows fled.

But let us leave such thoughts as these,
And view the towns and villages
Seen from this lofty mound.
See Ebley with its busy mill,
With Randwick, Painswick, Paganhill,
And Stroud the borough town.

Two members from this town are sent,
To plead our cause in Parliament,
Should taxes grow severe;
And Horsman, we sincerely hope,
Will do his part as well as Scrope,
And then we need not fear.

Still further, see old Bisley's spire,
A steeple quite as high or higher,
Than most in Gloucestershire;
And thousands round that sacred pile,
Lie sleeping till the seventh vial
Is poured on the air.

Then turn your eyes more eastward still,
And Bisley Common, Chalford Hill,
And Eastcombe may be seen.
Hamlets lie thick on every side;
Browns Hill, and Bussage, Oakridge, Hyde,
France Lynch and Avening Green.

Then Rodborough, with its church and fort,
Appers with Dudridge and King's Court,
And other hamelys near.
More southward Hampton Common's seen,
With Littleworth and \"Sinkley Green,\"
Pinfarthings and the Bear.

The south west view is not so good,
'Tis hidden by the Penhill-wood,
Where blackbirds build their nests;
But now appears a prospect wide,
And language fails me to describe
The beauties of the west.

Dean Forest, with its hills and dales,
And villages still nearer Wales,
Rich fields and meadows green;
With Blakeney, Newnham, and Chepstow,
And many parts I do not know,
From Selsley may be seen.

There Severn rolls its mighty tides,
There Britain's banner proudly rides;
Britannia's flag flies fast;
Her colours wave o'er every sea,
No matter who the foe may be,
She nails them to the mast.

Here parish churches you may view,
With towers and steeples old and new,
From Foster down to Stone,
See Cambridge, Slimbridge, Coaley, Cam,
With Frampton, Fretherne, Arlingham,
Standish and Eastingdon.

Near Stonehouse church a river's seen,
Rolling through meadows large and green,
To join the Severn's tides,
Near to it's banks are brooks and ponds,
With Stonehouse mill, and Beard's and Bond's,
And many more besides.

From Selsley's high and noted hill,
You have a view of Stanley Mill,
Where woollen cloths are made,
Of almost every name and hue,
As black, or brown, or green, or blue,
Broad, double-milled, and tweed.

Here you the Stanley Towers may see,
Two churches built, or said to be,
By antichristian Rome;
But now no mass is said or sung,
Nor prayers read in the Latin tongue,
In either sacred dome.

Long o'er these plains may Jacob's star
Preside, till the loud trump of war
Is heard on earth no more;
Till swords, and every murderous blade,
Be into wheels and ploughshares made,
And cannons cease to roar.

The Winslow Boy
South Woodchester was once the home of George Archer-Shee, who was falsely accussed of theft at naval college in 1908 - though at the time of the case, the family lived at The Lawns in Nailsworth. The celebrated case was dramatised by Terence Rattigan: first in a stage play, and then a film made in 1948, starring Robert Donat, Margaret Leighton, Cederic Hardwicke and Basil Radford, and directed by Anthony Asquith.
In 1999 David Mamet made a second film, generally well-reviewed, starring Nigel Hawthorne, Jeremy Northam and Rebecca Pidgeon.
I hope this is of some help to you
kind regards
Karianne

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  • Karianne Fisher
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9 years 5 months ago #371 by Karianne Fisher
Karianne Fisher replied the topic: Re:Jeptha Young
Jeptha Young
Jeptha Young was a self-taught poet who lived in King's Stanley during the mid to latter half of the nineteenth century. Jeptha was a weaver, working at Stanley Mill, who had been born in Bisley around 1812 and had then moved to Middle Yard in 1839 with his wife and nine children. He wrote at least three volumes of poetry. This is an extract from his poem 'Selsley Hill.' which first appeared in 'Rural Poems; or Rhymes from the Loom' published in the 1850s:


For ages Selsley Hill has stood,
Before the fall, before the flood
Its mighty base was laid;
Before the sun his rays possessed
Or drove his chariot to the west,
It reared its lofty head.

Perhaps upon this pleasant spot
Fierce battles have been often fought,
Where thousands bled and died;
The spear, the battle-axe and bow,
Lie buried here, for aught we know,
Close by the warriors side.

It may be here the Briton stood,
And faced the Roman foe, while blood
Dyed nature's carpet red;
Or here the Saxon drove the Dane
Down its steep side, whilst like the rain
The showers of arrows fled.

But let us leave such thoughts as these,
And view the towns and villages
Seen from this lofty mound.
See Ebley with its busy mill,
With Randwick, Painswick, Paganhill,
And Stroud the borough town.

Two members from this town are sent,
To plead our cause in Parliament,
Should taxes grow severe;
And Horsman, we sincerely hope,
Will do his part as well as Scrope,
And then we need not fear.

Still further, see old Bisley's spire,
A steeple quite as high or higher,
Than most in Gloucestershire;
And thousands round that sacred pile,
Lie sleeping till the seventh vial
Is poured on the air.

Then turn your eyes more eastward still,
And Bisley Common, Chalford Hill,
And Eastcombe may be seen.
Hamlets lie thick on every side;
Browns Hill, and Bussage, Oakridge, Hyde,
France Lynch and Avening Green.

Then Rodborough, with its church and fort,
Appers with Dudridge and King's Court,
And other hamelys near.
More southward Hampton Common's seen,
With Littleworth and \"Sinkley Green,\"
Pinfarthings and the Bear.

The south west view is not so good,
'Tis hidden by the Penhill-wood,
Where blackbirds build their nests;
But now appears a prospect wide,
And language fails me to describe
The beauties of the west.

Dean Forest, with its hills and dales,
And villages still nearer Wales,
Rich fields and meadows green;
With Blakeney, Newnham, and Chepstow,
And many parts I do not know,
From Selsley may be seen.

There Severn rolls its mighty tides,
There Britain's banner proudly rides;
Britannia's flag flies fast;
Her colours wave o'er every sea,
No matter who the foe may be,
She nails them to the mast.

Here parish churches you may view,
With towers and steeples old and new,
From Foster down to Stone,
See Cambridge, Slimbridge, Coaley, Cam,
With Frampton, Fretherne, Arlingham,
Standish and Eastingdon.

Near Stonehouse church a river's seen,
Rolling through meadows large and green,
To join the Severn's tides,
Near to it's banks are brooks and ponds,
With Stonehouse mill, and Beard's and Bond's,
And many more besides.

From Selsley's high and noted hill,
You have a view of Stanley Mill,
Where woollen cloths are made,
Of almost every name and hue,
As black, or brown, or green, or blue,
Broad, double-milled, and tweed.

Here you the Stanley Towers may see,
Two churches built, or said to be,
By antichristian Rome;
But now no mass is said or sung,
Nor prayers read in the Latin tongue,
In either sacred dome.

Long o'er these plains may Jacob's star
Preside, till the loud trump of war
Is heard on earth no more;
Till swords, and every murderous blade,
Be into wheels and ploughshares made,
And cannons cease to roar.

The Winslow Boy
South Woodchester was once the home of George Archer-Shee, who was falsely accussed of theft at naval college in 1908 - though at the time of the case, the family lived at The Lawns in Nailsworth. The celebrated case was dramatised by Terence Rattigan: first in a stage play, and then a film made in 1948, starring Robert Donat, Margaret Leighton, Cederic Hardwicke and Basil Radford, and directed by Anthony Asquith.
In 1999 David Mamet made a second film, generally well-reviewed, starring Nigel Hawthorne, Jeremy Northam and Rebecca Pidgeon.
I hope this is of some help to you
kind regards
Karianne

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  • Karianne Fisher
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9 years 5 months ago #391 by Karianne Fisher
Karianne Fisher replied the topic: Re:Jeptha Young
There is a book you can buy in which Jeptha ia mentioned :-
Ebley Gloucestershire. Historical Notes and Memories of Old Ebley by Crystal Harrison, 2004, privately published, £8.00

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  • Mary Tilling
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8 years 3 months ago #506 by Mary Tilling
Mary Tilling replied the topic: Re:Jeptha Young
Hi, I know you posted over a year ago but thought it worth replying in hope you may still see my reply.
I don't know anything about Jeptha Young except that he was a distant relation to my late father, his mother, my Gran, was Emily Young, so that makes you and I related in some way.

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  • Roger Clarke
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7 years 5 months ago #578 by Roger Clarke
Roger Clarke replied the topic: Re:Jeptha Young
Mary:
Sure i replied already on your post in the Bisley site but thought I would make sure. J Young was my gggrandfather and his daughter Emma Young m. to Richard Clarke was my ggrandmother . Her son one of many moved to Canada about 1917 after he was injured in the WW I. Would love to hear anything about the extended family of Young s that you may know of. You can respond direct to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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